Month: September 2012

Galerie Rosemarie Jaeger, Hochheim, Germany

Galleries exhibiting jewelry are an important part of our community and the people who run them have interesting backgrounds and stories to tell. In this interview Rosemarie Jaeger from Galerie Rosemarie Jaeger in Hochheim, Germany answered some questions posed by Damian Skinner. Galerie Rosemarie Jaeger Rosemarie Jaeger: The house and adjoining buildings date from 1742, …

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Leonor Hipolito

Aaron Decker portrait Aaron Decker: When did you start studying jewelry? Leonor Hipolito: 1994. I started studying sculpture in Lisbon, Portugal at Ar.Co (School of Art and Visual Communication) and had a technical education at School Contacto Directo. I wanted to continue with sculpture, but then I switched to jewelry. I was very focused on …

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Leonor Hipolito

Aaron Decke Aaron Decker recently approached AJF to publish some interviews with jewelers on the blog. He is a recent graduate of Maine College of Art where he received a BFA in Jewelry and Metalsmithing. During his final year he was selected as one of ten Windgate Fellowship Grant recipients for 2012. This award is sponsored by the Center for Craft, Creativity and Design and given to outstanding emerging artists in the field of craft. The Award allows young artists to establish a studio practice and expand their work after school. With the grant, Aaron hopes to experience the diversity of jewelers working in Europe by researching their work, practices and environments within which the work is made. He has chosen to concentrate mainly on Portugal, but also on jewelers he meets during his study. The research manifests itself as interviews with artists and organizations that we have elected to publish on the AJF blog. This interview with Leonor Hipolito from Lisbon, Portugal is the first that we will post during the next few months.

Aaron Decker: When did you start studying jewelry?

Leonor Hipolito: 1994. I started studying sculpture in Lisbon, Portugal at Ar.Co (School of Art and Visual Communication) and had a technical education at School Contacto Directo. I wanted to continue with sculpture, but then I switched to jewelry. I was very focused on the relationship of the objects towards the body and jewelry deals with both, the scale and portability. I find it interesting that an idea disseminates through an object that travels, while larger sculptures often are static and may only work in a specific environment. Jewelry is an art form that is in a constant clash with different environments.

Malvine Marichal: Pro-Forma

Malvine MarichalGalerie Pont en Plas is owned and run by Nicole Thienpont and last April the AJF blog featured an interview with Gesine Hackenberg, who was having a show with her at that time. This month, Malvine Marichal’s strange and wonderful work is in the gallery. There was a bit of a language barrier with this interview but I hope I have correctly translated their thoughts.

Susan Cummins: Nicole, what is your background and what led you to start a gallery?

Nicole Thienpont: My first degree was in chemistry at the University of Gent. In my language the degree is called ‘licentiate in chemistry.’ So for me the melting of metals and the experience in laboratories is very familiar. In 2002 I decided to start the gallery Pont & Plas in Gent, Belgium, with an emphasis on contemporary jewelry. My decision to begin the gallery was based on several things. In 1987 I graduated from the Academy of Art in Antwerp with a degree in art jewelry. In 2002 a dream space in Gent became free. It was just below my studio. I had been thinking that we urgently needed more places to exhibit the new jewelry young people were making. So it didn’t take too long to come to the conclusion that I should grab the space.

I understand from your website that you show many different art forms. How does jewelry fit in?

Nicole Thienpont: The emphasis lies on jewelry. There are about 30 people showing contemporary jewelry, national and international. Four times a year there is a special exhibition of glass, ceramics, paintings, drawings, photography and mixed media, designed to interact with the permanent presence of jewelry.

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