Month: September 2012

Leatrice S Eagle, JD, ASA, AAA

Eagle Associates, LLC 9309 Inglewood Court Potomac, MD 20854 Email: eaglel@leagleart.com Phone: 301-365-1510 (Office) 240-997-0023 (Cell) 301-365-6798 (Fax) Services offered to art owners include valuation to meet all requirements, planning and advisory services, and collection management. Valuation: • Pre-acquisition and pre-disposition valuations inform buyers of market levels for a specific piece by a particular artist …

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Kate Carmel, AAA

350 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019 Phone: 212 245 1136  Email: kmcarmel@aol.com Website: www.katecarmel.com Kate Carmel is a certified member of the Appraisers Association of America and is compliant with all USPAP requirements. When she was chief curator of the American Craft Museum (now the Museum of Arts and Design) in New York, …

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Karen Lorene

Facèré Jewelry Art Gallery 1420 5th Avenue, Suite 108 Seattle, WA 98101 Email: facereart@aol.com Phone: 206-624-6768 Website: www.facerejewelryart.com Karen Lorene, in retail for 40 years, is a member of the International Society of Appraisers and a Senior Member of the National Association of Jewelry Appraisers. For six years she appraised on Antiques Roadshow. She has …

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2012 SOFA Speaker

In 2012, Ursula Ilse-Neuman gave a lecture at SOFA NY titled ‘The Transcendent Jewelry of Margaret De Patta: Vision In Motion’. In her lecture, Ilse-Neuman spoke about De Patta’s relationship with modernism and particularly the artistic movement of constructivism. The talk was based on the exhibition Space-Light-Structure: The Jewelry of Margaret De Patta at the Museum of Arts …

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Mariko Kusumoto

Mobilia Gallery in Boston, Massachusetts, has been exclusively representing Mariko Kusumoto for many years. The gallery is owned and run by the sisters Joanne and Libby Cooper. They represent many major craft artists in a variety of media but jewelry has always had a strong presence. Mariko exists on the edge of jewelry making. In other words she sometimes makes jewelry but she mainly makes magical boxes and sometimes they contain jewelry. Her fertile imagination and unusual background have lead to some wonderful pieces, which we will discuss in this interview.

Mariko Kusumoto Susan Cummins: You have told the story many times that you were raised in Japan in a Buddhist temple and then moved to the United States. How old were you when you moved?

Mariko Kusumoto: I was 23 years old.

Did you study jewelry and metal work here or in Japan? Tell us about your training.

I attended a high school that offered a fine art major, where I learned the basic skills of drawing, sculpture, design and painting. After that I went to Musashino Art College in Tokyo. For the first two years, my major was oil painting and then I transferred to printmaking, focusing on etching. I moved to San Francisco and attended the Academy of Art University, where I pursued printmaking. However right before I graduated, I took a book art class and also beginner and intermediate jewelry and small metal art sculpture classes, which completely changed my direction from two-dimensional work to three-dimensional. I’m not a printmaker anymore but I use etching techniques for much of my work. When I was into printmaking, I was always fascinated by etched metal more than by the printed images on the paper.

Mariko Kusumoto

Mobilia Gallery in Boston, Massachusetts, has been exclusively representing Mariko Kusumoto for many years. The gallery is owned and run by the sisters Joanne and Libby Cooper. They represent many major craft artists in a variety of media but jewelry has always had a strong presence. Mariko exists on the edge of jewelry making. In other words she sometimes makes jewelry but she mainly makes magical boxes and sometimes they contain jewelry. Her fertile imagination and unusual background have lead to some wonderful pieces, which we will discuss in this interview.

Mariko Kusumoto Susan Cummins: You have told the story many times that you were raised in Japan in a Buddhist temple and then moved to the United States. How old were you when you moved?

Mariko Kusumoto: I was 23 years old.

Did you study jewelry and metal work here or in Japan? Tell us about your training.

Mariko Kusumoto: I attended a high school that offered a fine art major, where I learned the basic skills of drawing, sculpture, design and painting. After that I went to Musashino Art College in Tokyo. For the first two years, my major was oil painting and then I transferred to printmaking, focusing on etching. I moved to San Francisco and attended the Academy of Art University, where I pursued printmaking. However right before I graduated, I took a book art class and also beginner and intermediate jewelry and small metal art sculpture classes, which completely changed my direction from two-dimensional work to three-dimensional. I’m not a printmaker anymore but I use etching techniques for much of my work. When I was into printmaking, I was always fascinated by etched metal more than by the printed images on the paper.

Nanna Melland

Galerie Specktrum in Munich, Germany, is having an exhibition this month with Nanna Melland. For the second interview in his series, Aaron Decker talks with Nanna and so, with a bit of synchronicity, we will post this interview to accompany her show. Nanna is a Norwegian jeweler of real intensity. And Aaron is a recent …

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Nanna Melland

Galerie Spektrum in Munich, Germany, is having an exhibition this month with Nanna Melland. For the second interview in his series, Aaron Decker talks with Nanna and so, with a bit of synchronicity, we will post this interview to accompany her show. Nanna is a Norwegian jeweler of real intensity. And Aaron is a recent graduate who is using a CCCD (Center for Craft, Creativity and Design) grant to travel in Europe and interview artists.

Nanna Melland Aaron Decker: Where did you grow up?     

Nanna Melland: I grew up in Norway, Oslo, a country of natural extremes. From extreme cold and darkness to extreme brightness and almost extreme heat. As a child, I lived two years in Spain with my family.

Were you introduced to jewelry early on?

Nanna Melland: My father was a painter. He made his living from it. I grew up with that as a possibility. Tone Vigeland, the jewelry artist, was a friend of my parents and she liked my fathers painting, so they swapped. She would get a painting and my mother would get a piece of jewelry from her. From a very early age, I would recognize my mothers whereabouts from the sound of her Tone Vigeland bracelets. Tone Vigeland was my first encounter with contemporary jewelry. She started in the field of craft and now she has ended up in sculpture. Without that link, I do not think I would have gone into contemporary jewelry myself. When I decided to go into the arts, it was difficult to start painting because my father was a painter, so I began with jewelry and it felt very familiar.<--break-><--break->

Where did you study?

Nanna Melland: Well, many places. Do you mean jewelry school?

Yes.

Nanna Melland: I first started in a craft school in Oslo and finished a journeyman exam. Then I continued with jewelry design at a school in Copenhagen, Denmark –which by the way I didn’t finish. I only stayed for one year and discovered that I was not a designer. Finally I finished my studies at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste München, where I studied with Professor Otto Künzli for six and a half years.

Elizabeth Essner, AAA

178 Hicks Street #3, Brooklyn, NY 11201 Phone: 646 318 1944 Email: e_essner@msn.com Elizabeth Essner is a certified member of the Appraisers Association of America. She is USPAP certified and can provide appraisals for insurance, estate tax and charitable donations. A specialist in twentieth century design for nearly a decade, Elizabeth Essner began evaluating modern decorative arts focusing …

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