Month: September 2012

Karl Fritsch: ‘Lucy’ or scientifically: AL288-1

Karl Fritsch Karl Fritsch, the prolific, original jeweler is having a show at Galerie Rosemarie Jaeger in Hochheim, a little town outside of Frankfurt, Germany. It is a beautiful space as you will see in the installation shots and contrasts beautifully with Karl’s ‘misshapen’ jewelry.

Susan Cummins: Gerd Rothmann wrote about the bowl you created for this show by saying: ‘Out of this bar of gold Karl Fritsch has wrought, using a heavy hammer in a somewhat disrespectful (if not brutal, or in any case quite unsubtle) way, a somewhat misshapen looking bowl. It would seem that he went about doing this with the express desire to shatter any professional notion of aesthetics: the manner in which he mistreated the precious and venerated material was admirably cheeky.’ Your approach is disquieting. Why do you work this way?

Karl Fritsch: If I answer that question I can tell you the story of my life, or I can say I don’t know. I think the text from Gerd gives a answer and it is my ultimate pleasure and reason to make work like that, if somebody can engage with it in the way Gerd does. No bullshit! The bit of text you quote is taken from a longer text. It might help to read the whole text as it gives some ideas about answers.

‘(First you have to imagine one kilogram of pure 24 carat gold: its weight; its golden yellow lustre; its softness. Merchants used to bite on gold coins, testing if the gold was genuine on the basis of the indentation made by their teeth.

Lisa Walker: Powderly

Portrait of Lisa Walker Susan Cummins: You have received recognition through prizes like the 2010 Francoise van den Bosch award and your work has been collected by museums in New Zealand and Europe. You have certainly taken the lead in producing some of the most challenging contemporary jewelry this field has ever seen. What are …

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Lisa Walker: Powderly

Portrait of Lisa Walker Klimt02 is most famous in the jewelry community as a website where the full breath of the field is displayed. It is a fabulous resource, but it is also a gallery in Barcelona, Spain, started by Leo Caballero and Amador Bertomeu. This month they are featuring an exhibition by the indomitable New Zealand jeweler Lisa Walker.

Susan Cummins: You have received recognition through prizes like the 2010 Francoise van den Bosch award and your work has been collected by museums in New Zealand and Europe. You have certainly taken the lead in producing some of the most challenging contemporary jewelry this field has ever seen. What are you thinking?

Lisa Walker: Thank you! I’ll cut and paste that for my next book, like a show off. There’s often a fine line between showing off and informing people about what you do, (like Facebook, etc) or total overkill. It’s almost an uncomfortable experience to post and post and email and email about yourself, sort of hand over eyes and click. Anyway I haven’t really answered you. What am I thinking? In a sentence, I’m thinking about jewelry, about art, about materials, about ideas, about no ideas, about how far I can go that it still makes sense, about resonance, about love, about life, culture, about myself, about the world, politics, about that innate humanness and wonder in brilliant work, about what is good – and that will do for now.

Galerie S O, Solothurn, Switzerland and London, England

Galleries exhibiting jewelry are an important part of our community and the people who run them have interesting backgrounds and stories to tell. In this interview Felix Flurry from Galerie S O, with locations in Slothurn, Switzerland and London, England answered some questions posed by Damian Skinner. Damian Skinner: You have two galleries, one in …

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Anja Eichler: Urbanauts

Portrait of Anja Eichler Susan Cummins: Your new show at Vander A Gallery is called Urbanauts. What does that word mean? Anja Eichler: Urbanaut (pl. Urbanauts) is an invented word. Its roots come from Latin ‘urbanus’ = urbanized, courteous, witty and from Greek: ‘nautés’ = sailors. An Urbanaut cruises the cities as a sailor does …

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Anja Eichler: Urbanauts

Anja Eichler Vander A Contemporary Art Jewellery in Brussels, Belgium, owned by Françoise Vanderauwera, is doing some very interesting things to bring jewelry into the contemporary art scene there. This wonderfully quirky show by Anja Eichler currently on view at the gallery became an occasion for the gallery to plan a project based on the jewelry, which resulted in a video.

Susan Cummins: Your new show at Vander A Gallery is called Urbanauts. What does that word mean?

Anja Eichler: Urbanaut (pl. Urbanauts) is an invented word. Its roots come from Latin ‘urbanus’ = urbanized, courteous, witty and from Greek: ‘nautés’ = sailors. An Urbanaut cruises the cities as a sailor does the seas. I am an Urbanaut. I sail through the life of Shanghai. I navigate in a culture that is not mine, among people who are foreign to me and who do not speak my language. The pieces that I made last year in Shanghai reflect my impressions and experiences in the city. Hence, I called this series ‘Urbanauts.’

I understand that you are German but now live in Shanghai. Why are you there?

Originally I lived in Berlin and I moved to Shanghai a year ago. My husband wanted to live abroad for some time after having been in Berlin for ten years. So we were looking for a place where we could both pursue our careers. That place was Shanghai. Funnily, there is also another part of that story. My husband and I were in Shanghai seven years ago and at that time I was already fascinated by the city. And I said to my husband, ‘I could very well envision living here for two years.’ Back then, it was just said in a rush of emotions as a tourist being fascinated by ‘exotic’ and foreign surroundings. But it became real. 

I have already lived in foreign countries: in the United States, in Italy and for a few months in France. I am very curious about foreign cultures and environments and love to explore them. Of course, traveling is also a possibility for getting new impressions. However, I think that one is much more forced to reflect on oneself and to challenge traditional perspectives when living in another country and experiencing the daily life.

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