Month: May 2012

Innovation and Craftsmanship: The Jewelers of Quebec

Group photo: [left to right] Francois Macerola, director SODEC; Jean-Pierre Dion, Quebec Trade Office; Annegret Morf; Pierre-Yves Paquette; Jean-Pierre Gauvreau; Elise Bergeron; Gustavo Estrada; Barbara Stutman; Matthieu Cheminee; Patricia Kiley Faber; Roland DuBuc; Lynn Legare; Antonio Serafino; Laurie Dansereau; Janis Kerman;Claudio Pino; Edward S. Faber; Jean-Francois Hould, Quebec Trade Office Susan Cummins: Can you give …

Innovation and Craftsmanship: The Jewelers of Quebec Read More »

Bernhard Stimpfl-Abele: Organic Metal

Atty TantivitAtty Tantivit opened ATTA Gallery in Bangkok a year and a half ago. After acquiring an MA degree in Marine Biology, Atty took one of those detours to jewelry that led her to Europe and eventually to opening her gallery. She says, ‘I wanted to open a gallery in Thailand as I would like to share with other people the kind of jewelry that I fell in love with. If I can fall in love with it, I am sure there will be other people who will as well and I just have to give them opportunity to see more of it. Also I had some artist friends in Thailand who had no platform to showcase their works. Having a gallery opened the  door for them as well. We have some well-known artists who made it big abroad but are nobody at home. I think this needs to change.Bernhard Stimpfl-Abele’ So how is she doing? ‘I like to think that the first year was the time that ATTA Gallery learned how to crawl and how to stand up. Now we are walking slowly but steadily. I hope that next year we will be running!’ During the month of May 2012, Atta Gallery is showing the work of Austrian artist Bernhard Stimpfl-Abele He has a unique way of working as he explains in this interview.

Susan Cummins: What is your background? Where are you from? Where did you attend school? Where do you live now?

Bernhard Stimpfl-Abele: I am a goldsmith and jewelry artist with a master’s degree from the Konstfack University in Stockholm, Sweden. I live between Italy and Sweden and I was born in Austria.

Bernhard Stimpfl-Abele: Organic Metal – The Old, the New and the Ambivalence in Between

Portrait of Atty Tantivit Susan Cummins: What is your background? Where are you from? Where did you attend school? Where do you live now? Bernhard Stimpfl-Abele: I am a goldsmith and jewelry artist with a master’s degree from the Konstfack University in Stockholm, Sweden. I live between Italy and Sweden and I was born in …

Bernhard Stimpfl-Abele: Organic Metal – The Old, the New and the Ambivalence in Between Read More »

Lasse and Helena Pahlman

Helena Pahlman (left) with Silvia Walz (middle) and Ramon Puig Cuyas (right) from Spain. Photo: Lasse Pahlman Damian Skinner: These collectors are not in their thirties, they’re in their fifties and sixties. Is it a situation where, as people get older, they suddenly become contemporary jewelry collectors? Or are we are not capturing the interest …

Lasse and Helena Pahlman Read More »

Emmy + Gijs + Aldo

Exhibition Poster Emmy van Leersum Aldo Bakker Aldo Bakker, Watering Can Another noteworthy complaint involved the size and clarity of the text and photos. I found myself straining to read label information and decipher images.  The font, at times, appears to be in the single digits. I speculate that this reduction is motivated by the …

Emmy + Gijs + Aldo Read More »

Joyaviva: Live Jewellery From Across the Pacific

The Joyaviva exhibition at RMIT Gallery features objects, jewelry, film projection and related printed materials all under the inclusive moniker of ‘Live Jewellery from across the Pacific.’ However it is much more than a discrete thematic exhibition of contemporary wearables by 23 artists from Australia, Chile and New Zealand. It is part of a larger Joyaviva project that spans …

Joyaviva: Live Jewellery From Across the Pacific Read More »

Delphine Joly: Jewels Stories

Vander A GalleryFrançoise Vanderauwera opened Vander A Contemporary Art Jewellery in November 2011 in Brussels, Belgium. She is young and energetic and comes at jewelry from a design perspective and it will be interesting to watch the course she charts in the coming years. Her current show is Jewels Stories by Delphine Joly. It is a very curious and unique collection of jewelry – qualities that also apply to Delphine herself.

Susan Cummins: You are really new on the scene. Can you give me some background what lead you to decide to open a jewelry gallery?

Françoise Vanderauwera: Yes, I am very new on the scene. I knew four years ago that I wanted to open a gallery to show much more of these wonderful artworks to a wider public. The starting point for me was design. I grew up using cutlery by the architect-designer Arne Jacobsen, which my father, who was also an architect, received personally from him. A few years ago, when a Brussels design shop I used to visit closed I began looking for contemporary creators and was amazed by how many high profile gold- and silversmiths, object designers and new jewelers I could recognize. I learned and traveled a lot and now the gallery is up and running.

 

Delphine Joly: Jewels Stories

Vander A GalleryFrançoise Vanderauwera opened Vander A Contemporary Art Jewellery in November 2011 in Brussels, Belgium. She is young and energetic and comes at jewelry from a design perspective and it will be interesting to watch the course she charts in the coming years. Her current show is Jewels Stories by Delphine Joly. It is a very curious and unique collection of jewelry – qualities that also apply to Delphine herself.

Susan Cummins: You are really new on the scene. Can you give me some background what lead you to decide to open a jewelry gallery?

Françoise Vanderauwera: Yes, I am very new on the scene. I knew four years ago that I wanted to open a gallery to show much more of these wonderful artworks to a wider public. The starting point for me was design. I grew up using cutlery by the architect-designer Arne Jacobsen, which my father, who was also an architect, received personally from him. A few years ago, when a Brussels design shop I used to visit closed I began looking for contemporary creators and was amazed by how many high profile gold- and silversmiths, object designers and new jewelers I could recognize. I learned and traveled a lot and now the gallery is up and running.

Rachelle Thiewes

Libby and Joanne Cooper Mobilia Gallery in Cambridge, Massachusetts, was established in 1978 by Libby and Joanne Cooper, a sister team. Since then, this dynamic duo has been featuring high quality decorative arts, sculpture, paintings and studio jewelry. Rachelle Thiewes has been showing with Mobilia since 1994 and this is her second solo show. Rachelle is a professor at UTEP and an articulate and unique maker. I was delighted by her responses to my questions. If you are interested in seeing more of her work you can purchase a recent publication about a collaborative project she recently completed.

Susan Cummins: What is your background and how did you come to be interested in art jewelry?

 Rachelle Thiewes: I grew up in a family that made things. My parents built our first house, kitchen cupboards and all, my mother designed and made most of my clothing (and hers) she made white feather Christmas trees in the 1950s (pre Target) and sold them in Dayton’s department stores, we invented, crafted and made most everything it seems. My mother felt quite strongly that everyday us kids needed to spend significant time playing and creating. The one TV was pretty much off limits except for Disney on Sunday night. It was a rich childhood.Rachelle Thiewes

In many ways I was destined to become a jeweler. My father was a hand engraver, freelancing for many jewelry stores, including Tiffany. I spent countless hours in the studio watching him engrave and often accompanied him to our local jewelry stores when delivering work. I have two older brothers that are artists so it seemed natural that I too would study art. I had no idea that ‘metals’ was an art subject until I saw the first student show at Western Illinois University. I was fascinated by the possibilities of the medium and quickly changed over my major from sculpture to metals.

 

Rachelle Thiewes

Libby and Joanne Cooper Mobilia Gallery in Cambridge, Massachusetts, was established in 1978 by Libby and Joanne Cooper, a sister team. Since then, this dynamic duo has been featuring high quality decorative arts, sculpture, paintings and studio jewelry. Rachelle Thiewes has been showing with Mobilia since 1994 and this is her second solo show. Rachelle is a professor at UTEP and an articulate and unique maker. I was delighted by her responses to my questions. If you are interested in seeing more of her work you can purchase a recent publication about a collaborative project she recently completed.

Susan Cummins: What is your background and how did you come to be interested in art jewelry?

 Rachelle Thiewes: I grew up in a family that made things. My parents built our first house, kitchen cupboards and all, my mother designed and made most of my clothing (and hers) she made white feather Christmas trees in the 1950s (pre Target) and sold them in Dayton’s department stores, we invented, crafted and made most everything it seems. My mother felt quite strongly that everyday us kids needed to spend significant time playing and creating. The one TV was pretty much off limits except for Disney on Sunday night. It was a rich childhood.Rachelle Thiewes

In many ways I was destined to become a jeweler. My father was a hand engraver, freelancing for many jewelry stores, including Tiffany. I spent countless hours in the studio watching him engrave and often accompanied him to our local jewelry stores when delivering work. I have two older brothers that are artists so it seemed natural that I too would study art. I had no idea that ‘metals’ was an art subject until I saw the first student show at Western Illinois University. I was fascinated by the possibilities of the medium and quickly changed over my major from sculpture to metals.

Scroll to Top