Hardware Artware

ATTA Gallery, Bangkok, Thailand

ATTA Gallery in Bangkok, Thailand, is run by Atty Tantivit and shows an international selection of jewelers with local ones. It makes for an interesting mix worth looking in on from time to time. The exhibition Hardware Artware highlights five jewelers who have been showing together for a few years and who are experimenting with presentations. They have an interesting history.

Susan Cummins: Why did you choose these particular five artists–Francisca Bauzá (Germany), Lisa Björke (Sweden), Märta Mattsson (Sweden), Deborah Rudolph (Germany), and Nina Sajet (The Netherlands)—to be in this show?

Atty Tantivit: Though I have seen some of their works before separately, I first saw them working as a group at the exhibition Pin Up during Schmuck 2012. Their pieces are different in many ways but are of equal strength in terms of concept, technical quality, and their communicative languages. There was a synergy among them. I think the way they present their works together is fresh and exciting—a group of young female artists in a field that was dominated by men a decade or so ago. Also, all five of them are from northern European countries that are key players in terms of contemporary art jewelry. It was interesting for me to see similarities and differences in their works.

Content Images (WYSIWYG)
Francisca Bauzá
Lisa Björke
Hardware Artware, 2013, Atta Gallery, Bangkok, Thailand
Märta Mattsson
Deborah Rudolph
Nina Sajet

Kobi Bosshard: Times Revisited—A Grandfather Recalled

The National, Christchurch, New Zealand

Kobi Bosshard Recently, Kobi Bosshard was honored as part of an ongoing series at New Zealand’s Object Space called “Master of Craft.” It celebrates the achievements of outstanding New Zealand practitioners working at the highest level. The show and catalogue are the work of AJF’s former editor Damian Skinner. In the mid-twentieth century, Kobi brought his jewelry skills to New Zealand and provided a link from the old world to the new. In this show at The National in Christchurch, he is looking back at his heritage and to his grandfather Jacob Bosshard for new ideas.

Susan Cummins: You are the third generation in a line of Swiss goldsmiths. Why does this seem important for you to explore in this exhibition?

Kobi Bosshard: I like to remind myself, and others, that the world did not begin with me. That our forebears, for example my grandfather and my father, were highly skilled goldsmiths, and that I am at the very present edge of a very long tradition.

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Kobi Bosshard
Kobi Bosshard
Kobi Bosshard
Kobi Bosshard
Kobi Bosshard
Kobi Bosshard
Kobi Bosshard
Kobi Bosshard
Kobi Bosshard
Kobi Bosshard

Dramatic Jewelry: Five Masters

Aaron Faber Gallery, New York, New York, USA

Paolo Marcolongo Aaron Faber Gallery in New York City is presenting the work of five master jewelers from Europe and America. In an impressive showing of innovative stonecutters and metalworkers, this exhibit celebrates the creative talents of these jewelers. Patricia Faber answers some questions about the choice of jewelers and what is so special about their work.

Susan Cummins: The title of your show is Dramatic Jewelry. How would you define dramatic jewelry as opposed to any other kind?

Patricia Faber: The title of this show cannot be parsed. It is Dramatic Jewelry: The Five Masters. Usually, gallery show titles are headlines or banners to communicate the essence of the exhibition and to describe it to non-collectors as well as to the jewelry community. So the word “jewelry” in the title is essential. And in the presence of these works, their dramatic scale stands out. These are all artists exploring the sculptural possibilities of their media, and the works are large.

Content Images (WYSIWYG)
Atelier Tom Munsteiner
Design Peter Schmid
Design Peter Schmid
Paolo Marcolongo
Atelier Tom Munsteiner
Paolo Marcolongo
Michael Good
Charlotte De Syllas
Charlotte De Syllas

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