Gabrielle Desmarais and Anne-Marie Rébillard: Ce qui n’est pas là

Galerie Noel Guyomarc’h, Montreal, Québec, Canada
Missy Graff

Anne-Marie RébillardCe qui n’est pas là was on display at Galerie Noel Guyomarc’h, located in Montreal, Canada, from October 4 to October 20, 2013. The artists included in this exhibition were Gabrielle Desmarais and Anne-Marie Rébillard. In this interview, Gabrielle and Anne-Marie both discuss their process and how their work developed for this exhibition.

Missy Graff: Please tell me about your background. How did you become interested in making jewelry? 

Gabrielle Desmarais: When I first began college, I studied administration while making fashion jewelry for small shops in town. It took some time to realize that jewelry making was an option for me. After giving birth to my first child, I decided to go back to school to complete the jewelry program at the Montreal Jewellery School.

Anne-Marie Rébillard: I felt the need to learn how to work with my hands after I tried a different program of study where I was unsatisfied. I applied to the École de joaillerie de Québec, and I knew quickly after I started that I had found the training I was looking for. I realized that I could express myself through jewelry. For me, jewelery was slowly becoming an artistic medium, just as painting or sculpture can be.

Content Images (WYSIWYG)
Anne-Marie Rébillard
Anne-Marie Rébillard
Anne-Marie Rébillard
Anne-Marie Rébillard
Anne-Marie Rébillard
Anne-Marie Rébillard
Gabrielle Desmarais
Gabrielle Desmarais
Gabrielle Desmarais
Gabrielle Desmarais
Taxonomy upgrade extras: 

Atelier Zobel

de novo, Palo Alto, California, USA

Peter Schmid is the Atelier Zobel. Recently, he had a brief showing at de novo  fine contemporary jewelry in Palo Alto, California. We caught up with him to ask about his evolution and the jewelry he creates with his team. In a side note to the interview, he told me that he is very fond of de novo, not only because it is a great place, but also because it is where he met his wife Sue nine years ago. It was her second day on the job. They have been married for six years and have two kids now. Nice story to go along with the interview. 

Susan Cummins: Peter, what is your role at Atelier Zobel?

Peter Schmid: I am the new face of Atelier Zobel. I worked for Atelier Zobel for 11 years before taking over the studio in 2005. 

Please describe how the atelier works. How many people do you employ? What are their specialties?

Peter Schmid: Mathias Morgenstern started the year before I did, in 1993. We celebrated his twentieth anniversary this fall. Mathias is the leader of our workshop, an extremely talented goldsmith, and a great friend. It’s hard to think of our team as employees. It is more like family. We are a family of ten. Ten characters, including at least three divas, but I’m not naming any names. Everyone has his or her own flair. 

Content Images (WYSIWYG)

In Memory of Yvonne Joris

Helen W. Drutt English

Yvonne JorisBorn: January 23, 1950 in Hunsel, Netherlands

Died: September 29, 2013 in Leuven, Belgium

It was June 1982 when I first met Yvonne Joris at my eponymous gallery in Philadelphia. Within minutes, I fell under her enthusiastic spell and passion for the arts. She was accompanied by Evert van Straaten, who eventually became the director (now retired) of the Kröller-Müller Museum, in Otterlo. Before I knew it, I had become the central depot for their planned exhibition of American pottery, which opened in 1983, Who’s Afraid of American Pottery? That title in itself should have prepared me for what was to come. From that moment on, until her untimely death, it was a journey into the unexpected! 

Joris retired as director of the Stedelijk Museum in 's-Hertogenbosch in 2010, having led the museum since 1988, when it was initially known as Museum Het Kruithuis. She oversaw its renovation, expansion, and multiple moves through many challenging years. The museum was transformed from a regionally known collection of ceramics to an internationally renowned collection of contemporary art, artist’s ceramics, and jewelry. More than 5000 works dating from the past 50 to 60 years were acquired. A unique museum for the Netherlands was created- a unique museum for the world!

Yvonne’s interests were broad. Her dynamic personality made the impossible an attainable goal time and again. In addition to studio works, she responded to innovative design, especially Memphis, Droog, and Gijs Bakker’s project of Jewelry editions by artists-" Chi ha paura...?" (now CHP) She built extraordinary collections for the museum and curated groundbreaking exhibitions, which included Jewels of Mind and Mentality: Dutch Jewelry Design 1950–2000 (2000) and Private Passions: Artists Jewelry of the 20th Century (2009). The latter was her final exhibition. Can we forget the unique installation of a floating circle of cases in the midst of a dark room? The audience was offered spot flashlights so they could intimately examine each work. As one looked at the works by Calder, Fontana, Picasso, Meret Oppenheim, among others, one began to wonder how the budget of this museum could support these acquisitions. Her innovative manner of raising funds was legendary, as was her will to obtain work. It was not unusual for her to travel 12 hours by car to consider a work in a private collection. Like Thelma and Louise, we once drove to Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA, to look at a buried Salvador Dali brooch in a sea of costume jewelry, and then raced 100 miles to Princeton, New Jersey, to negotiate not jewelry but ceramic acquisitions of Ken Price, Robert Arneson, and Ron Nagle.

Content Images (WYSIWYG)
Yvonne Joris
Taxonomy upgrade extras: 

Siamese Connection

Brooklyn Metal Works, Brooklyn, New York, USA

Melissa TolarBrian Weissman and Erin S. Daily own and run Brooklyn Metalworks in Brooklyn, New York. It is a metalworking studio, a workshop space, a lecture venue, and an exhibition site. It is the full package. Brian and Erin worked with Sakurako Shimizu to curate this exhibition called Siamese Connection from a call for entries. The artists included in the show were Alexia Cohen, Caroline Gore, Cristina Dias, Ian Henderson, Jessica Andersen, Joanna Storm, Karen Vanmol, Katja Toporski, Kyle Patnaude, Mallory Weston, Melissa Tolar, Missy Graff, Niki Grandics, and Sarah Holden.

Susan Cummins: How did this curatorial collaboration come about? Please describe a little about yourselves in the process.

Brian Weissman: Every now and then, Erin and I like to sit around and brainstorm about interesting things we’ve come across, either in our lives or things that we’ve read or heard about. We make a list, and then talk about how they would make either an interesting show or how it would be a great premise for a class or workshop. Erin kind of threw out the idea of the Siamese connection, and at first, I thought it was too simple. But then it followed me around the city for a few days, and the more I saw these odd and ever present objects it started to take hold. I started to take pictures of them every time I passed them (there are three or four per block easily), and the more I thought about it, the more I liked it. 

Erin S. Daily: Brian and I decided from the beginning that Brooklyn Metal Works would host a juried exhibition every year to explore new ideas in the field. This meant that we would be jurors as well. And while I think we make good collaborators because we view the world from quite different perspectives while respecting the others opinion, it was obvious that we would need a third opinion in the mix. Not only to diversify the curatorial vision, but also to give voice to other artists and curators. 

Content Images (WYSIWYG)
Sakurako Shimizu
Sakurako Shimizu
Caroline Gore
Kyle Patnaude
Melissa Tolar
Melissa Tolar
Mallory Weston

SIMON COTTRELL: SURFACE DEPTHS

Klimt02 Gallery, Barcelona, Spain

Simon CottrellSimon Cottrell’s show Surface Depths at Klimt02 Gallery offered an occasion to question this articulate and verbose jeweler. He uses an unusual material called Monel and has a lot to say about improvisation, fingerprints, and the depth of surfaces. He is a deep thinker, indeed.

Susan Cummins: Before we start with the more in-depth questions, please tell me how you came to be where you are, doing what you are doing.

Simon Cottrell: In 1997, I completed a bachelors degree in fine arts with honors, majoring in gold and silversmithing at Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT). During my early years at RMIT, Carlier Makigawa and Robert Baines were teachers of the greatest influence.

From 1997 to 2008, I also worked with Robert as his assistant on his own work. This was a remarkably valuable experience through which I learned more than I knew was even possible about working with metal. Making your own work is very different from working with another artist on their work. It forces you to work in ways that are both conceptually and technically outside of your personal logic. It is the best way to learn while working.  

Content Images (WYSIWYG)
Simon Cottrell
Simon Cottrell
Simon Cottrell
Simon Cottrell
Simon Cottrell
Simon Cottrell
Simon Cottrell
Simon Cottrell
Simon Cottrell

Susanne Klemm: Oceanum

Galerie Ra, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Susanne KlemmSusanne Klemm

Suzanne Klemm studies nature, and specifically in this show at Galerie Ra  called Oceanum, she is paying attention to deep-sea life. The mysterious world of sea creatures has inspired many jewelers over the centuries. However, Suzanne doesn’t claim to be interested in any precursors and finds her own way to a translation from the deep blue sea to wearable jewelry. 

Susan Cummins: Can you tell the story of how you got interested in making jewelry?

Content Images (WYSIWYG)
Susanne Klemm
Susanne Klemm
Susanne Klemm
Susanne Klemm
Susanne Klemm
Susanne Klemm
Susanne Klemm
Susanne Klemm

Signs of Life

Facèré Jewelry Art Gallery, Seattle, Washington, USA

J. Fred WoellThis is the ninth year of the Signs of Life publication and exhibition at Facèré Jewelry Art Gallery. Karen Lorene, the owner of the gallery, is also a writer, and it is her passion to pair jewelry and writing. By telling parallel stories, the meaning of both the writing and the object are enhanced. The artists invited are Kevin Crane, Lisa Fidler, Chris Irick, Alexia Markarian, Eleanor Moty, Michael Owen O’Neill, Ron Pascho, Lin Stanionis, and J. Fred Woell. The authors quoted are Alan Averill, Stephanie Barden, Wendy Call, Sigrun Susan Lane, Paulann Petersen, Jennifer Munro, Cat Rambo, Susan Rich, and James Stark.

Susan Cummins: Signs Of Life is the ninth in the series of publications from Facèré Jewelry Art Gallery. How did it start? What compels you to continue?

Karen Lorene: For a number of years, Facèré Jewelry Art Gallery sent gifts to customers as a thank you for their continued support. During these years, I was in a writing group and kept thinking that our writing was good enough that we should create our own literary magazine. Time passed, and the writing idea stuck. The literary magazine idea morphed into a thank you gift.

Content Images (WYSIWYG)
Chris Irick
Chris Irick
Eleanor Moty
J. Fred Woell
Kevin Crane
Lin Stanionis
Michael Owen O’Neill
Ron Pascho

FANTASTICI! Contemporary Italian Jewelry

Art Gallery Putti, Riga, Latvia
Missy Graff

Adrean BloomardFANTASTICI! Contemporary Italian Jewelry is on display from September 26 to October 13, 2013 at Art Gallery Putti in Riga, Latvia. This exhibition features jewelry by 22 Italian artists: Catalina Brenes, Luisa Bruni, Maria Cristina Bellucci, Elisabetta Dupre, Anna Fornari, Emma Francesconi, Maria Rosa Franzin, Manuela Gandini, Heidemarie Herb, Giancarlo Montebello, Gigi Mariani, Paola Mirai, Rita Marcangelo, Margherita de Martino Norante, Alessandro Petrolati, Kellie Riggs, Barbara Uderzo, Ute Kolar, Eugenia Ingegno, Patrizia Bonati, Maura Biamonti, and Adrean Bloomard. In this interview Agita Putane, the owner of Art Gallery Putti, describes how the exhibition developed. 

Missy Graff: How did you come up with the concept for this exhibition? What do you feel is the most compelling aspect of the show?

Agita Putane: Everyone seeks after feelings that contribute to their happiness. For me, working in the field of contemporary jewelry creates these feelings. It has been clear for a while that the gallery would expand to include artists from other countries. Early on, we organized group and solo exhibitions exclusively for Latvian jewelry artists. However, we have been cooperating with foreign contemporary jewelry artists for almost six years.

Content Images (WYSIWYG)
Adrean Bloomard
Gigi Mariani
Art Gallery Putti
Art Gallery Putti
Art Gallery Putti
Luisa Bruni
Maria Cristina Bellucci
Maura Biamonti
Taxonomy upgrade extras: 

Top Young 2013

Ubi, Beijing, China

Han-Chieh ChuangA great article about Ubi by Anja Eichler was recently posted on our website, and it explains a lot about the challenges of having a contemporary jewelry and ceramics gallery in China. I recommend everyone read that article in order to have a context for the questions I am going to ask Machtelt Schelling, the founder of the gallery, about her show Top Young 2013.

Susan Cummins: First of all, please explain who thought of doing this show?

Machtelt Schelling: I thought of the show myself. The jewelry scene is quite new in Asia, and there are not many galleries or other platforms for young artists. Only a few of them are strong enough to keep working as a jewelry artist, so I wanted to organize something that could give them the platform and the courage to move on and to meet others beyond their own classmates.

How was Top Young 2013 organized? How many jewelers applied, and how many were chosen? What were the criteria?

Machtelt Schelling: The gallery sent out the call to as many schools, Asian jewelers, and platforms as possible. We received 74 submissions, and I selected a jury from outside the academies—Yu-Chun Chen of Mano Gallery, Taipei, and Ohchi Chitose of O-Gallery, Tokyo.

The jury discussed: if the applicant had developed his or her own creative language; if the concept was worked through in the piece; if there was a skilled use of material; and, if they made several pieces, if there was a consistency in the collection. We made the selection based on the pictures and descriptions sent to us. Once the 13 sent in their work, we decided on the top three.

Content Images (WYSIWYG)
Han-Chieh Chuang
He Jing
Pu Gang
Qie Li
Xiao Liu
Wang Qian
Wu Ching-Chih
Yang ZiYi
Sungho Cho

Raissa Bump and Amy Tavern: Parallel Constellations

Gallery Lulo, Healdsburg, California, USA
Missy Graff

Raïssa Bump and Amy TavernParallel Constellations is on display through October 5, 2013, at Gallery Lulo in Healdsburg, California, USA. This exhibition features collaborations between artists Raïssa Bump and Amy Tavern. In this interview, both Amy and Raïssa describe the concept and process of the exhibition from their perspective. 

Missy Graff: Please tell me about your background. Have you always had an interest in making jewelry? 

Amy Tavern: I began metalsmithing in 1998. Before that, I was interested in music and went to college to study opera. I switched majors early on and got a degree in arts administration instead. In my senior year, I took a series of visual art classes and began to discover a different kind of creativity, especially through my ceramics and sculpture classes. I had been curious about jewelry for a long time, and I had been making beaded jewelry in my free time since high school.

Content Images (WYSIWYG)
Raïssa Bump and Amy Tavern
Raïssa Bump and Amy Tavern
Raïssa Bump and Amy Tavern
Amy Tavern
Amy Tavern
Amy Tavern
Amy Tavern
Raïssa Bump
Raïssa Bump
Raïssa Bump
Raïssa Bump
Taxonomy upgrade extras: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - blogs